Descendants of Hendrick Willemsz

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1 "Jacob, the sixth son, married according to license dated May 2, 1771, Elizabeth Mount, and died July 24, 1831, aged 72 years, 6 months, 12 days, according to his headstone in the Old Yellow Meeting House cemetery. His wife is buried by him." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Jacob Gysbertse (I6495)
 
2 "Katrinje, bap. March 19, 1717; died young." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p. 124. SCHENCK, Katrintje (I5983)
 
3 "Tryntjc (Catharine) sixth child, is the only one who married and removed from this county and the only one of the seven daughters who did not join the church in this county. She married one Henry Dusberry or Dusenberry and Jersey or some other colony. She, however, while visiting her parents in Mon- mouth, had three of her children baptized in the Dutch church, viz: Antje. baptised December 19, 1736. Her brother John Hendrickson and his wife, Annetje Couwenhoven, appear as sponsore on church records. Anne, baptized December 24, 1738. Her brother, Hendrick Hendrickson and his wife, Neeltje Schenck, are sponsors. William Hendrickson. baptised Octo- ber 12. 1743. Her brother. William Hendrickson. and his wife, Mary Longstreet are sponsors. This is all the records given us of Catharine, where she lived and when and where she died is unknown." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p. 133. , US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Tryntje (I5217)
 
4 "William, baptized December 25, 1736, married, according to license granted December 21, 1756, Charity Robinson of Monmouth county and died before his father, leaving four children surviving. One child named Charity, died December 23, 1761, and is buried in Brick church cemetery with a headstone giving her name and age. He also had a son John, baptized November 19, 1757, who was his firstborn. As no others are buried in Brick church yard it is ikely that they removed to some other place or colony." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Willam (I6336)
 
5 DW: 23296

First name also given as Margret or Margretta.

HHFO: D0111100503-S1
DW record number: 23296

HHFO: D0111100503-S1
DW record number: 23296 
QUIGLEY, Margaret Jane (I3225)
 
6 !All information from LDS IGI: Ba: 8830205 42 So: 1553304. BROOKS, William (I1056)
 
7 !All information from LDS IGI: Ba: 8830205 43 So: 1553304. BROOKS, Delphine (I1053)
 
8 !All information from LDS IGI: Ba: 8830205 43 So: 1553304. BROOKS, Milan (I1054)
 
9 !All information from LDS IGI: Ba: 8830205 43 So: 1553304. BROOKS, Clark (I1055)
 
10 !All information: IGI: Ba: 8830205 44 So: 1553304. BROOKS, Amy (I1051)
 
11 !DW record number: 27391

!IGI Index SS: 19 Dec 1974 Manti So: 934296 Ba 7335118 28 Date of Mar 30 Oct
1806

!IGI states John Neely. Actual name is Jason Neely. P. 258 Simpson Co Ky
Records compiled by Simpson Co. Historical Society. Cemetery Headstone
Inscriptions, including death and birth records of seven children. 
NEELY, Jason (I162)
 
12 !LDS: IGI Ba: 5005230 40 So: 1553254; gives birthplace as Davis Co., Iowa;
Duplicate ordinances: BAP 27 Jan 1989 JRIVE, END 1 Mar 1989 JRIVE, SP 15 Mar
1989 JRIVE; with Prairie City, Jasper, Iowa as birthplace.

See separate PAF data files for descendant information.

DESCENDANTS OF Granville Edgar HENDRICKS AND Elizabeth C. JOHNSON Release 1.0 January, 1997. Created with PAF 2.31.

Distributed by the Henry Hendricks Family Organization:
Larry Hendricks
2372 S. Bountiful Blvd.
Bountiful, UT 84010 $10.00 donation suggested

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

The information contained in these files is as accurate as we can possibly make it; however, there still may be errors. Any corrections or new information will be gratefully accepted. Updates to these files may be made at various times. Notification of updates will be made through "The Hendricks Herald" newsletter available from the Henry Hendricks Family Organization and by the Granville Edgar HENDRICKS family.

The Henry Hendricks Family Organization assumes that the users of these data files are familiar with the PAF programs and have obtained legal copies of the program and the accompanying instructions. Please refer any questions about PAF and how to use the various programs to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family History Department or to your local PAF specialists.

AN EXPLANATION OF THE IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS

The identification numbers used in this file are birth order codes indicating the relationship each individual has to Granville Edgar HENDRICKS. The note file for each individual also contains the Henry Hendricks Family Organization ID number showing the relationship to Henry Hendricks, along with the HENRY HENDRICKS GENEALOGY, 1963 (Red Book) number, and the Dale Walker index number when available.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ NAME: Granville Edgar HENDRICKS
HHFO: D02050702 1963: NA DW record no.: 19111

No biographical information is currently available. Anyone having such information is encouraged to contact the Henry Hendricks Family Organization.

HHFO: D0102040706

See separate PAF data files for descendant information. 
HENDRICKS, Granville Edgar (I169)
 
13 !Nancy Neely HENDRICKS 1991: 72 1963: 40 DW record number: 26286

!Unmarried. No further information.

!IGI Index All Indivual Ordinances F#: 458539. Another Record IGI F#: 177933
P#: 1120 O#: 42991 
HENDRICKS, Nancy Neely (I149)
 
14 !SOURCE Birth & LDS: IGI: F#: 452936 O: 45982 WEST, Leonard Morgan (I1040)
 
15 !SOURCE: B, E, SP; IGI 1994 Edition. HENDRICKSON, Geesje (I51)
 
16 !SOURCE: IGI: Ba: B674804 22 So: 1396238 Film
New child found in IGI Parent search by Joan Smith, 1997; more research needed
to determine family information, if any. 
GATTON, Isaac (I1037)
 
17 !SOURCE: Jordan River Temple Family File card.

No further information available at this time. 
BARNARD, Margaret A. (I3774)
 
18 !SOURCE: Jordan River Temple Family File card.

No further information available at this time. 
BARNARD, Susan B. (I3775)
 
19 !SOURCE: SS: IGI: Ba: M504181, So: 824392; Marriage Evangelical Lutheran Church,
Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. Duplicate SS: 2 Dec 1978 LANGE.

HHFO: D0104-S1
DW record number: 27739

Birth place: PROBABLY FREDERICK CO., MD 
HINKLE, Charlotte (Keziah) (I24)
 
20 "Abraham Hendricks may have been the oldest of the eight children of John Hendricks, but there is no record of his birth or baptism unless the "Old Dutch Bible," which his father mentions in his will, be found. Neither do I know where Abraham died or where he was buried. He seems to have resided in Upper Freehold and run a grist mill at or near Imlaystown or Allentown. During the Revolution he was an earnest and energetic patriot and a soldier. I have no information or knowledge of his children, if any. His father's selection of him as executor and gift of family Bible to him leads me to think he was the oldest son." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Abraham (I6326)
 
21 "Annetje, (Ann) the eighth child of above named parents, was baptized December 30, 1711, married 1732, William, son of Jacob Couwenhoven and Saartje Schenck, his wife. Their names appear as communicants on records of the Dutch church in 1741 as follows: "Wilm Couwenhoven and Antje Hendrikze, his wife." They had three children, viz: Saartje (Sarah) born in 1733, married Jacob, (born 1730) son of William Wyckoff and Agnes VanDorn, his wife. Their license was granted January 7, 1754. She died August 25, 1796, and her husband March 5, 1812, according to their headstones in Tennent church yard. Daniel, baptized March 30, 1737, married August 23, 1757, Helena, daughter of George Taylor, and died December 26, 1808, according to inscription on his tombstone in Lippet and Taylor burying ground on the old Daniel J. Hendrickson farm, now owned by the Morfords at east end of Middletown village. An old Bible with name of "Rebecca Covenhoven" written on front leaf, as owner, contains the following family record: "Daniel Covenhoven, born January 27, 1737, Helena Covenhoven, his wife, was born February 10, 1737, married August 23, 1757. Anne Covenhoven, their daughter, was born July 9, 1758, about nine o'clock in the forenoon. Rebecka Covenhoven, born March 27, 1761, about five o'clock in the afternoon. William Covenhoven, born April 7, 1763, about five o'clock in the morning. George Covenhoven, born December 13, 1767, about three o'clock in the afternoon. Daniel G. Conover and Sarah Ann Cooper were married December 16, 1818." Jacob, third child, was baptized October 14, 1739; no other record. William Conover, as name is now spelled, the father of above three children, died intestate in 1742, Letters of administration on his estate were granted October 17, 1742, to his widow, Ann, his brother Ruliph, and his brother-in-law, William Hendrickson. The widow, however, did not remain long in mourning for she married March 17, 1744, William Couwenhoven, (born July 20, 1700; died November 10, 1755) son of Cornelius Couwenhoven and Margaret Schenck, his wife, of Pleasant Valley. He, too, had lost his first wife, Jannetje Wyckoff and buried her by his father in the Schenck-Couwenhoven cemetery. By this second marriage there were two children, a son and daughter, viz: Cornelius, born February 11, baptized April 7, 1746; married January 13, 1767, Mary (born December 6, 1740, died January 3, 1860), daughter of Hendrick Hendrickson and Neeltje Schenck, his wife and heretofore mentioned. He died October 10, 1806, aged 60 years, 7 months, 27 days, according to his headstone in Schenck-Couwenhoven yard. This will is recorded in Book A of Wills at Freehold. By Mary Hendrickson he had following four children: Anne, baptized December 6, 1767 ; married October 13, 1785, Abram VanHorne. Nelly, baptized February 24, 1771 ; married December 14, 1790, Cornelius VanHorne. Lydia, baptized December 20, 1778 ; married January 22, 1807, Daniel Polhemus of Middlesex county, N. J. William Hendrick, baptized June 2, 1782, ied unmarried September 26, 1805, and is buried by his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather in Schenck-Couwenhoven yard. Catharine, the only daughter, was baptized April 16, 1749; married January 15, 1767, Nicholas VanBrunt, son of Nicholas VanBrunt and Geesye Hendrickson, his wife, whose names appear as communicants in records of the Dutch church in 1731. This Geesye Hendrickson was a sister of Daniel and William Hendrickson, the pioneer settlers. Nicholas VanBrunt was Sheriff of Monmouth county in 1778. He removed all the prisoners in our county jail to Morris county before the British army reached Freehold in June, 1778. He and Colonel Daniel Hendrickson were deputies to the Provincial Congress of New Jersey from Shrewsbury township in 1775. He was an active and zealous patriot during the Revolution and a Captain in the militia. By Catharine Couwenhoven, his wife, he had following children: Cornelius, baptized July 23, 1769. Nicholas, baptized August 4, 1771. Antje, baptized May 8, 1774. Mary, baptized June 25, 1775. Hendrick, baptized April 5, 1778. Daniel Covenhoven, baptized April 30, 1780; died young. Sarah Wyckoff, baptized September 28, 1781. Daniel Conover, baptized November 18, 1787. Sheriff Nicholas VanBrunt, a few years after the close of the Revolutionary War, sold his farm near Tinton Falls to Col. Daniel Hendrickson and removed with his family to Cherry Valley, New York, where he lived the rest of his life." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.138-139, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Annetje (I4593)
 
22 "Conradt, baptized August 27, 1738, married first, according to license dated June 18, 1759, Mary English. She died October 26, 1762, aged 27 years, leaving one daughter, Elizabeth, baptized at Tennent church November 22, 1761. He married for his second wife Mary Knott. This license is dated June 17, 1763. During the Revolution he sided with the King and enlisted in the company raised by Capt. Thomas Crowell which served in the battalion under Col. Elisha Lawrence, the ex-sheriff or last of the Kings' Sheriffs in Monmouth county. This battalion was in Skinner's Brigade and was stationed much of the time on Staten Island. On page 12 of Book A of Executions in the Monmouth Clerk's office is record of an execution issued May 1, 1779, against Thomas Crowell of Middletown township who had been found guilty under an inquisition of joining the King's army. On the next page, No. 13, is record of an execution against Conradt Hendricks, who had also joined the King's army. The real estate of these men was sold under these executions. They, however, never returned to this county, so far as I can learn. They may have removed to Nova Scotia." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKS, Capt. Coonradt (I6322)
 
23 "Cornelius, fifth son, is supposed to be the same person named in marriage license granted January 28, 1767, to Cornelius Hendrickson and Mary Thorn of Monmouth county. No other knowledge." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Cornelius Gybertse (I6434)
 
24 "Daniel, born November 11, 1727; married in 1767, Mary Schenck, (see license in Secretary of State's office) and died without surviving children March 2nd, 1776, aged 48 years, 3 months, 21 days, according to his headstone inscription in homestead yard. His wife is not buried by him, which would indicate that she has married again. His will is recorded at Trenton in Book M of Wills, page 16-17. He describes himself as "Daniel Hendrickson, Jr., of Middietown township." He gives his wife Mary £1400, with household goods and a negro girl. All his real estate is devised in fee equally between his two brothers, Garret and Hendrick. He bequeaths £100 to his sister, Nelly VanMater, and the same amount to his sister, Mary Couwenhoven, and £20 to his sister Ann, with a negro man. To James Schenck. a cow and calf. This will is dated Feb. 18, 1775, proved March 12, 1776. His two brothers, Garret and Hendrick.divide the lands so devised between them by quit claim deeds, recorded in Book I of Deeds, page 92, Monmouth County clerk's office." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p. 130. HENDRICKSON, Daniel (I6115)
 
25 "Daniel, third son, was born about 1737; married Ann Stewart, and settled somewhere near what is now Hamilton Square. He was a zealous patriot and soldier of the Revolution." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Daniel Gysbertse (I5424)
 
26 "David, the seventh and youngest son, to whom his father left the homestead, which lay, I think, in what was then Nottingham township, Burlington county, but now part of Mercer county, lived and died on this farm, but I have no dates of his marriage or death. One of the maternal uncles of these seven sons was John Polhemus, who lived in Upper Freehold township and died there without children. His will is dated June 7, 1788, proved 1793, and recorded at Trenton, N. J., in Liber, 33 of Wills, p. 234. This John Polhemus married Alice, daughter of Joseph Holmes and Elizabeth Ashton* his wife, of Upper Freehold. She died April, 1788, according to her headstone in Yellow Meeting House cemetery, aged 61 years, 10 months. Her husband died September 15, 1793, aged 72 years, and is buried by her. In his will he names his wife's cousins. Elizabeth and Sarah, daughters of Jonathan Holmes, and Elizabeth, daughter of John Holmes, and Elizabeth Wyckoff, daughter of Peter Imlay. He also mentions his own sister, Catherine, who married Matthias Laen (Lane). (They are named as members of Dutch church in 1750). If she is dead he orders legacy paid to her children. He mentions children of his brothers, Daniel Polhemus, Tobias Polhemus and Cornelius Polhemus, and children of his sisters, Nelly Couwenhoven and of Elizabeth Hendrickson. "My brothers' and sisters' children." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, David Gysbertse (I6492)
 
27 "Elizabeth, baptized August 25, 1734, married according to license dated May 20, 1754, and recorded in office of Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J., John Vanderbilt of Staten Island, N. Y., and died August 13, 1760, aged 26 years, 1 month, 13 days, according to her headstone in Brick church cemetery. She left two sons, who are the executors named in her father's will made 25 years later, or in 1785. Under this will they sold and conveyed away his real estate, as appears from deeds recorded in Monmouth Clerk's office." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Elizabeth (I6314)
 
28 "Guisbert (Gilbert), baptized May 24, 1741, died single March 25, 1785, aged 44 years, 1 month, 2 days, according to his headstone in Brick church cemetery at Marlboro." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKS, Guisbert (I6596)
 
29 "Gysbert. (Gilbert) b. February 24. 1694: m. Maijke. (Micha) daughter of Daniel Hendrickson and Kaatje VanDyke. his wife. He was a communicant in our Dutch church in 1721, and she in 1740. when her sister, Francyntje. wife of Tunis DeNeis, (Denise) also joined the church. Gilbert VanMater owned and lived on the farm where Gideon C. MacDowell now resides near Old Scots burying ground in the township of Marlboro, but formerly a part of Freehold township. S I do not know where he died or where he is buried." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, Jan Gybertsen Metrn and His Family p. 68, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, (Micha) Maykije (I5639)
 
30 "Hans (John) the third child of William Hendricks, married Sarah Mosier, and died March 25, 1789, aged 89 years, according to his headstone in yard of Marlboro Brick church. His wife is interred by him and date of her death given as March 31, 1782, aged 80 years, 24 days. On page 86 of Wells' address her name is spelled "Sarah Meser" and she became a communicant in 1731. John Hendricks, as he wrote his name, made his will May 18, 1785, proved April 15, 1789, and is on record in Trenton in Book 30 of Wills, page 178, etc. He orders his executors to sell his land at Imlaystown, Upper Freehold township, and one half of his mill where his son, Abraham Hendricks, now lives in that township, and all other lands owned by him. He gives his old Dutch Bible and £10 to his son Abraham. He mentions his granddaughter Charlotte, and four children of his deceased son William. He also mentions his grandsons, Jacob and John Vanderbilt, children of his deceased daughter Elizabeth. He speaks of two children of his son Conradt, appoints his son Abraham Hendricks, and his two grandsons, Jacob and John Vanderbilt, executors. The will is witnessed by Mary Vanderbilt and Lewis Forman. Seven of the children of John Hendricks and Sarah Mosier, his wife, are buried in the yard of the old Brick church at Marlboro. All have the Hendricks surname. Some of his descendants removed to Easton, Pa., and to Rockingham and other counties in Virginia. By Sarah Mosier he had the following children: Johannes, baptized April 8, 1733, married, according to the license granted October 31, 1759, Phoebe Smith, and died, according to his headstone, July 13, 1760, aged 28 years, 5 months, 1 day. His will is dated July 2, 1760, proved July 26, 1760, and recorded at Trenton in Book 9 of wills, page 258, etc. He described himself as a resident of Middlesex county, New Jersey. I think it was in that part of Middlesex county taken off in 1838 to form Mercer county. He mentions his wife Phoebe, but had no children. He gives his brother William, six shirts and two beaver hats, and to his brother Guisbert (Gilbert) the remainder of his wearing apparel. He also mentions his brother-in-law, John Vanderbilt. The will is witnessed by John Hendricks, Andrew Forman and Lewis Forman. This John Hendricks, the witness, I think was a son of Gilbert Hendrickson and Elizabeth Polhemus, his wife, already mentioned, and residing in what was Nottingham Township, Burlington county, but now Ewing township, Mercer county. Elizabeth, baptized August 25, 1734, married according to license dated May 20, 1754, and recorded in office of Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J., John Vanderbilt of Staten Island, N. Y., and died August 13, 1760, aged 26 years, 1 month, 13 days, according to her headstone in Brick church cemetery. She left two sons, who are the executors named in her father's will made 25 years later, or in 1785. Under this will they sold and conveyed away his real estate, as appears from deeds recorded in Monmouth Clerk's office. William, baptized December 25, 1736, married, according to license granted December 21, 1756, Charity Robinson of Monmouth county and died before his father, leaving four children surviving. One child named Charity, died December 23, 1761, and is buried in Brick church cemetery with a headstone giving her name and age. He also had a son John, baptized November 19, 1757, who was his firstborn. As no others are buried in Brick church yard it is ikely that they removed to some other place or colony. Conradt, baptized August 27, 1738, married first, according to license dated June 18, 1759, Mary English. She died October 26, 1762, aged 27 years, leaving one daughter, Elizabeth, baptized at Tennent church November 22, 1761. He married for his second wife Mary Knott. This license is dated June 17, 1763. During the Revolution he sided with the King and enlisted in the company raised by Capt. Thomas Crowell which served in the battalion under Col. Elisha Lawrence, the ex-sheriff or last of the Kings' Sheriffs in Monmouth county. This battalion was in Skinner's Brigade and was stationed much of the time on Staten Island. On page 12 of Book A of Executions in the Monmouth Clerk's office is record of an execution issued May 1, 1779, against Thomas Crowell of Middletown township who had been found guilty under an inquisition of joining the King's army. On the next page, No. 13, is record of an execution against Conradt Hendricks, who had also joined the King's army. The real estate of these men was sold under these executions. They, however, never returned to this county, so far as I can learn. They may have removed to Nova Scotia. Guisbert (Gilbert), baptized May 24, 1741, died single March 25, 1785, aged 44 years, 1 month, 2 days, according to his headstone in Brick church cemetery at Marlboro. Mary, baptized April 7, 1744, married Thomas Hendricks, who, I think, resided somewhere near Hopewell, N. J. She died November 5, 1768, aged 24 years, according: to her headstone in Brick church cemetery. Her husband is not buried in this yard and I do not know what became of him or whether she left any children. Sarah, baptized June 28, 1747, died single February 28, 1772. Abraham, born ____, married, according to license dated December 17, 1754, Mary, daughter of William Wyckoff and Agnes VanDoren, his wife. She was born October 1, 1733, and died February 12, 1796, and is buried in Brick church cemetery. Abraham Hendricks may have been the oldest of the eight children of John Hendricks, but there is no record of his birth or baptism unless the "Old Dutch Bible," which his father mentions in his will, be found. Neither do I know where Abraham died or where he was buried. He seems to have resided in Upper Freehold and run a grist mill at or near Imlaystown or Allentown. During the Revolution he was an earnest and energetic patriot and a soldier. I have no information or knowledge of his children, if any. His father's selection of him as executor and gift of family Bible to him leads me to think he was the oldest son. Jannetje, the fourth child of William Hendricks and Willaimpe Laen, his wife, married Christopher Warmsley, and moved to some other part of New Jersey or some other colony. She had, however, three of her children baptized in our Dutch church while visiting her parents, viz: William, baptized May 3, 1719, and two others unnamed, one October 25, 1724, and the other April 16, 1732." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, pp.153-154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Johannes (I5270)
 
31 "Henry and Sarah lived at Middletown Point (north of Middletown) until 1761 or later when the sixth of the their twelve children was born. In 1761 Henry Hendrickson advertised 500 acres of land for sale "near Middletown". The later when the sixth of the their twelve children was born. In 1761 Henry Hendrickson advertised 500 acres of land for sale "near Middletown". The family does not appear in local church records after that year, so apparently they were successful in disposing of their land. Despite diligent searching, no further record has been found for Henry and Sarah until they appear in the Rockingham Co., North Carolina 1790 census with 3 males between ages 16 and 60 and four white females. Where the family was between 1761 and 1779 remains a mystery, except for clues which come from the pension application records of two of their sons, Albert and William. Both sons stated they joined the Maryland Flying Camp unit on their first enlistments in the Revolutionary War in Fredericktown, Frederick, Maryland in 1776 and 1777, and both stated they were residents of Fredericktown at the time of their enlistments.

Henry and Sarah were not found in the records of Frederick or surrounding counties. Albert does state his third and fourth enlistments (1779 and 1781) were from North Carolina, indicating the family had moved south by then. In the 1800 census of Rockingham County, Henry is listed with persons in the household consisting of 1 male and 1 female over age 45. Neither Henry nor Sarah appear as head of a household in the 1810 census, and as Henry would have been 70 and Sarah about 68, it would be reasonable to assume that both probably died between 1800 and 1810. Early in the 1800's their sons began disposing of land in North Carolina and moving west. The demise of their parents may have precipitated their willingness to move on. No disposition of land, cemetery records, or probate court records have been found for Henry. He apparently used the Hendrickson form of the name earlier in his life and dropped the "son" at some point in North Carolina. Nothing is known of the four daughters except for the christenings of the first two in Middletown. It is a good possibility they married into some of the same families their brothers married into, and that their identities were lost. Perhaps some or all of them went west with their brothers.

In the 1800 census of Rockingham County, Henry is listed with persons in the household consisting of 1 male and 1 female over age 45. Neither Henry nor Sarah appear as head of a household in the 1810 census, and as Henry would have been 70 and Sarah about 68, it would be reasonable to assume that both probably died between 1800 and 1810. Early in the 1800's their sons began disposing of land in North Carolina and moving west. The demise of their parents may have precipitated their willingness to move on.

No disposition of land, cemetery records, or probate court records have been found for Henry. He apparently used the Hendrickson form of the name earlier in his life and dropped the "son" at some point in North Carolina. Nothing is
known of the four daughters except for the christenings of the first two in Middletown. It is a good possibility they married into some of the same families their brothers married into, and that their identities were lost. Perhaps some or all of them went west with their brothers." Research of Mary Hart, Henry Hendricks PAF File Version 2,0, Released on CD 7 Apr 2000. 
HENDRICKS, Henry (I1)
 
32 "I find Daniel Hendrickson running a girst mill on the Millstone river, in Somerset county. N. J., in the year 1741. This may be the same person. His grandfather (uncle), Hendricks Hendrickson, with Peter Cortelyou, Stoffel Probasco, Thepdon Polhemus, Hendrick Lott, Jacques Cortelyou, Dionje Denyse, and Cornelius Wyckoff, purchased in 1701, of John Harrison ten thousand acres of land in Franklin township, Somerset county, N. J. This land extended from Millstone river over to the old Indian path which ran from the tails of the Delaware River across New Jersey to a point about three miles from the mouth of the Raritan river. Here the river was crossed and the path ran over to Mount Pleasant and from there to Crawford's Corner, and from there over the hills by the residence of Daniel Hendricks, the pioneer settler to Ruckman's Hills at Middletown village, and here intersected the old Indian path from Freehold to the bay shore and to Sandy Hook. The eight purchasers divided this trac into eight parts. Now Daniel Hendrickson, the youngest son of William, had an opportunity to learn the miller's business in his father's mill on Mahoras brook, heretofore mentioned. His uncle Daniel, left him by will a small lot of land at Perth Amboy. This would indicate that Daniel had removed to this town or vicinity at the mouth of the Raritan river. His grandfather (uncle), Hendrick, owned lands on the Millstone River which afforded a good site for grist mills, a business which he understood. Neither is Daniel Hendricks, the youngrest son of William, named in any of our county records after the probate of his uncle Daniel's will. There is a probability from these considerations that the miller of this name on the Millstone river in 1741 may have been this man." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, pp.154-155, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Daniel (I5178)
 
33 "Jannetje, (Jane) the tenth child and youngest of the seven daughters of Daniel Hendrickson. was born and brought up on the homestead at Holmdel. She married Ruliph, (born March 1, 1712) a son of Jacob Couwenhoven and Saartje Schenck, his wife, their nearest neighbors. She had known him from her earliest recollections. They had played and romped together, sung Dutch nursery songs and followed the customs and usages which prevailed at that time among their own people. The same characteristics, manners and usages marked them as those described by Miss Gertrude Lefferts Vanderbilt in her book called "The Social History of Flatbush and the Manners and Customs of the Dutch in Kings County, L. I." They were the children of these Long Island people and were like them in all respects, for the "Dutch were not given to change but were stable in all their ways." It was not until the Revolutionary war tore up the foundations of society and government, that there was any great change in families and classes. Up to this time the Dutch language was generally used in family intercourse or the home life. Theree are a few persons now living, born and brought up in Pleasant Valley, Holmdel township, who can remember when children, of hearing and singing the words of the following Dutch nursery song which Miss Vanderbilt has published in her book:

Trip, a trop, a tronjes,
De Varkens in de boonjes,
De Koejes in de Klaver.
De paarden in de haver,
De eenjes in de waterplass.
So groot myn Kleine Claus-was."

These lullabies and a few words like "stoep," "Mickey," "paas," "skipper" and "baas" (boss) are the last lingering echoes of the mother tongue once spoken by those old settlers in Monmouth who came from Kings county on Long Island. There is a wide difference in the spirit and sentiment expressed in these lullabies of the Dutch, from those of the English, or Mother Goose melodies' as called. The former represented people and animals comfortable and contented, pleasant associations and memories, and cheerful and sunny prospects. Or they inculcated some lesson of industry, economy, faithfulness or other everyday virtue. Their saint Santa Claus was jolly and benevolent, always doing generous and kindly acts. But childhood and youthful days soon pass. On the 12th of August A. D. 1741, Jannetje Hendrickson married Ruliph Couwenhoven. Their marriage license is published in full on page 34 of Wells' Memorial Address at Brick Church. It was signed by Lewis Morris so prominent in the early history of Monmouth county, but at that time Governor of New Jersey. These licenses are all recorded in secretary of state's office at Trenton and in annexed note is a list from the records of all licenses issued to the Hendricksons and Hendricks in Monmouth county, between 1748 and 1772. Jannetje and Ruliph Couwenhoven her husband, had three children, viz: Sarah, bapt. August 12, 1742, married in 1763 Benjamin (baptized October 10, 1742) son of Benjamin VanCleaf and Helina or Neeltje Couwenhoven, his wife. Daniel, baptized January 15, 1744. No other knowledge. Catrina, baptized Feb. 16, 1746, married February 28, 1765, David (baptized September 25, 1748) son of Tunis Vanderveer and Aeltje Garretse Schenek, his wife. This couple had a son Tunis, who married December 12, 1792, Margaret, a daughter of Rev. Benjamin DuBois. Ruliph Couwenhoven died intestate in 1746. Letters of ministration on his estate were granted same year to his brother, Peter Couvenhoven, and his brothers-in-law, William Hendrickson and Tunis Denise. Jannetje, however, did not remain a widow long, for the next year, 1747, she married Peter, a son of Jan Schanck and Saartje Couwenhoven of Pleasant Valley. He had lost his first wife, Jannetje VanNostrand or Ostrandt and was ready for another. By Peter Schenck she had following children: Roelef P., known as "Long Ruly" born December 27, 1748, baptized January 22, 1749, married Elizabeth Gordon (born December 8, 1757, died August 15, 1837) and died November 26, 1814. Both buried in Tennent church yard. Jannetje, born June 1, bapt. July 28, 1751 ; married December 5, 1769, John Walter (born June 11, 1730, died October 11, 1775, according to his headstone in Schenck-Couwenhoven cemetery) and died January 5, 1774. A son of this couple named John Walter, is buried by them in above yard and his headstone gives date of his death October 13, 1837, aged 66 years and 11 months. Antje, baptized September 30, 1753, married Garret Janse Couwenhoven. She was his second wife and died April 5, 1803, according to her headstone in yard of Marlboro BrickChurch. Her children have been already named in Conover genealogy. Leah, baptized November 9, 1755, married November 30, 1775, John, (baptized August 26, 1750) son of Benjamin VanCleaf and Neeltje or Helena Couwenhoven, his wife. Francyntje, baptized March 7, 1762, married February 5, 1803, William Nicolas. Neeltje, baptized June 17, 1759. No other record." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, pp .141-142, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. 
HENDRICKSON, Jannetje (I4902)
 
34 "Johannes, baptized April 8, 1733, married, according to the license granted October 31, 1759, Phoebe Smith, and died, according to his headstone, July 13, 1760, aged 28 years, 5 months, 1 day. His will is dated July 2, 1760, proved July 26, 1760, and recorded at Trenton in Book 9 of wills, page 258, etc. He described himself as a resident of Middlesex county, New Jersey. I think it was in that part of Middlesex county taken off in 1838 to form Mercer county. He mentions his wife Phoebe, but had no children. He gives his brother William, six shirts and two beaver hats, and to his brother Guisbert (Gilbert) the remainder of his wearing apparel. He also mentions his brother-in-law, John Vanderbilt. The will is witnessed by John Hendricks, Andrew Forman and Lewis Forman. This John Hendricks, the witness, I think was a son of Gilbert Hendrickson and Elizabeth Polhemus, his wife, already mentioned, and residing in what was Nottingham Township, Burlington county, but now Ewing township, Mercer county." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Johannes (I6547)
 
35 "John, second son, married November 14, 1763, Anna Cox, and resided in what is now Ewing township, Mercer county." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, John Gysbertse (I4812)
 
36 "John, the second son and fourth child of Daniel Hendrickson, the pioneer settler, was born about 1702; married about 1734, Annetje, (born in February 1708) daughter of Jacob Couwenhoven and Saartje Schenck, his wife. The parental homestead of these young people in a direct line over the meadows and hills were less than a mile apart. They had know each other from their earliest childhood. After his marriage John settled on a farm in county of Middlesex, which his father had pur- chased of Stephen Warne and which he had given to him by will. Here the following children were born: Daniel, born July 3, 1735; married in 1758 Eleanor VanMater (b. Aug. 4, 1735, d. Feb. 12, 1828). He died November 17, 1809, and is buried in family yard on farm of late George Crawford Hendrickson, his great grandson, at east end of Middletown village and still owned by this family. Names of his children have already been published in the VanMater family. Jacob, baptised February 12, 1738; no other information. John Hendrickson died in 1740 and letters of administation of his estate were granted October 11, 1740, to his eldest brother Hendrick, to his brother-in-law William Couwenhoven, and Henry Disbrow, see Book C of Wills, page 335, secretary of state's office, Trenton, N. J. I do not know whether his widow survived him or not. She would have right of administration, but as she is not named, it would seem that she had died prior to her husband. Maijke (Micha) the fifth child, mar- ried Geysbert VanMater (b. Feb. 24, 1694). Names of their children have been heretofore published in genealogy of the VanMaters. Tryntje (Catharine) sixth child, is the only one who married and removed from this county and the only one of the seven daughters who did not join the church in this county. She married one Henry Dusberry or Dusenberry and aremoved to some other part of New Jersey or some other colony. She, however, while visiting her parents in Monmouth, had three of her children baptized in the Dutch church, viz: Antje, baptised December 19, 1736. Her brother John Hendrickson and his wife, Annetje Couwenhoven, appear as sponsore on church records. Anne, baptized December 24, 1738. Her brother, Hendrick Hendrickson and his wife, Neeltje Schenck, are sponsors. William Hendrickson, baptised October 12, 1743. Her brother, William Hendrickson, and his wife, Mary Longstreet are sponsors. This is all the records given us of Catharine, where she lived and when and where she died is unknown." . Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, John (I6126)
 
37 "Joseph, b. in Monmouth county February 5 ; bap. Aug. 13, 1710: m. December 1, 1734, Sarah, daughter of Roelof Schanck and Geesie or Ghesye Hendrickson, his wife. Sarah Schanck was born May 22, 1715, and died, according to inscription on her tombstone in the VanMater cemetery, September 1, 1748, aged 33 years, 3 months and 9 days. Her husband rests by her side and his headstone states that he died October 15, 1792, aged 82 years, 8 months and 10 days. Joseph VanMater and Sarah Schanck, his wife, became members of the Dutch church in 1737, and were said tohave been active and zealous in church work, and lived consistent lives. Their children and grandchildren always spoke of them with affection and reverence." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 68. SCHENCK, Sarah (I5982)
 
38 "Mary, baptized April 7, 1744, married Thomas Hendricks, who, I think, resided somewhere near Hopewell, N. J. She died November 5, 1768, aged 24 years, according: to her headstone in Brick church cemetery. Her husband is not buried in this yard and I do not know what became of him or whether she left any children." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Mary (I6335)
 
39 "Roelof Schenck. the eldest son of Jan Schenck and Sara Couvenhoven, his wife, had no real estate devised to him under his father's will although he was appointed one of the executors. The reason of this was that he had acquired a large tract of land at and in the vicinity of wha is now Bradevelt station. Marlboro township, then a part of Freehold township. The younger son John, had doubtless remained at home working on his father's farm. He was 28 years old when he married Nellie Bennett. When his father's will was executed he was unmarried, while the eldest son Roelof, had been married some thirty years, and had eight children and also grandchildren at this time. His dwelling house stood near the site of the Brick Church, about two or three hundred yards south of the public road, which now passes by the Brick Church, and about 500 yards east of the railroad track. The buildings are now all gone. The lands owned by him in this vicinity are now cut up into several large and valuable farms, some of which are still owned and occupied by his descendants on the female side. Rev. Theodore W. Wells in his memorial address at Brick church, speaks of this Roelof Schenck, and states he was called "Black Roelof" and noted for his great physical strength. He was also the person who selected the site of the church edifice, where it has remained to this day, by carting the first load of building stones to the spot. On page 308 in "Old Times in Old Monmouth" are several references to this Roelof Schenck, who was quite a noted business man in his day and active in church work. The first two Schenck brothers. Garret and Jan. were among the first organizers and supporters of the Dutch church in Monmouth county. Their names appear on the early records, both as elders and deacons. The majority of their descendants down to the present day have generally sustained this church or the churches which have sprung from it. They have been married, their children baptized and their funerals solemnized by the clergymen of the Dutch church. Many ot them sleep then- last sleep in the yard adjacent to the Brick Church, as the tombstones show. Rev. Theodore W. Wells has given us a full history of the successive pastors of this church, but the history of the congregation is yet to be written. When it is. the Schencks and their kinsmen among the Hendricksons, Vanderveers, Conovers and Smocks, will occupy the most conspicuous places.... Roelof Schenck not only owned the lands around what is now the Marlboro Brick church, but he lived and died in his dwelling house near this spot. He also married the daughter of Daniel Hendrickson, who was one of the principal organizers of the Dutch church of Monmouth county, and one of its earliest elders. His name and the name of his wife, Catharine VanDyke, appear among communicants of this church as early as 1709." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, pp. 6-10. SCHENCK, Roelof Janse (I4591)
 
40 "Sarah, baptized June 28, 1747, died single February 28, 1772." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p 154, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Sarah (I6347)
 
41 "Teuntje, the second child of Daniel Hendrickson, was an earnest and active member of the Dutch church, while her husband, Jonathan Holmes, like all his family, was a zealous believer in the tenets of the Baptist faith. The baptism by immersion was one of their most important doctrines. Neither did they believe in infant baptism. Teuntje Hendrickson must have been a woman of great resolution, for she had her children baptized in the Dutch church and taught the Heidelberg catechism. Her children are the only Holmeses whose names appear on the old records of the Monmouth Dutch church. There must have been much talk and holding up of hands in amazement among the good brethren of the Baptist faith, that these descendants of the sturdy Rev. Obadiah Holmes should be sprinkled and not immersed. There must have been many earnest appeals made to their father against this woeful departure from the true faith. The only reply Jonathan Holmes, Jr., could make, I suppose, was "When a woman will, she will, and when she won't, she won't." Teuntje, however, was never able to bring her husband clear over, as Margaret Wyckoff had done with Jonathan Forman, but she turned her "Holmes" children into good "Dutchmen." The records of our Dutch church show that Jonathan Holmes and Teuntje Hendrickson, his wife, had the following children baptized: Obadiah, bapt. Oct. 28, 1716, died unmarried in 1752. The records in the office of the Secretary of State show that letters of administration on his estate was granted to his brother, Joseph Holmes, Jr., Oct. 17, 1752, Book B of Wills, p. 69. Daniel, bapt. April 9, 1721, m. 1752, Leah, (b. 1736, d. March 15, 1813) daughter of James Bowne and Margaret Newbold, his wife. Both are buried in yard of Hoimdel Baptist church. Jonathan, bapt. July 19, 1722, married Sarah Potter in 1758, and was a merchant in New York city in 1752. He may have been the "Jonathan Holmes" called "Minor." Joseph, b. ____, m. June. 1752, Sarah, daugh- ter of James Mott and Mary Holmes, his wife, and was engaged with James Mott, Jr., in mercantile business in New York city. He died in 1763. James Mott and James Mott, Jr., appointed administrator of Joseph Holmes, Sept. 22, 1763, Book H of Wills, p. 293, Secretary of State's office. John, b. ____; m. 1764, Catharine Brown, was associated with his brother Jonathan in business in New York city in 1752. In 1763 he resided at and operated a grist mill at Forked River in what is now Ocean county, but then part of Monmouth. During the Revolutionary war his dwelling was plundered by a party of refugees. He left three sons who married and had numerous descendants. Many of these followed the water and were captains of vessels in coasting trade. Alice, bapt. March 30, 1730; m. 1749, John VanBrakle. d. May 19, 1796. Catharine, b. May 11, 1731; d. May 12, 1796, aged 63 years, 1 day, according to the inscription on her headstone in Schenck-Couwenhoven yard, where she is buried by her first husband, Hendrick Schenck. She left a will, recorded at Trenton, N. J. She married first in 1749, Hendrick, son of Roelof Schenck and Ueesey Hendrickson, his wife, who died August 24, 1766. She married secnd, John, son of Garret Schenck and Neeltje Voorhees, his wife. She was his third wife. He died Feb. 13, 1775, on his wife's farm near what is now Bradevelt station, and was buried by his father and mother in Schenck-Couwenhoven yard. There were no children by the last marriage. Mary. James, bapt. Jacobus, May 1, 1737. Samuel, bapt. July 8, 1739. William, b. ____ , died in 1776. Letters of administration in his estate were granted to his brother, Daniel Holmes, Feb. 2S, 1776. See Book M of Wills, p. 29, Secretary of State's office, Trenton. Catharine Holmes, the seventh child of Jonathan Holmes, Jr., and Teuntje Hendrickson, his wife above mentioned, by her first husband, Hendrick Schenck, had seven children, of whom five lived to grow up, viz: one son, Ruliff, and four daughters, Mary, Eleanor, Catharine and Ann. Her youngest child, Ann, was born on her farm near what is now Bradevelt station, June 14, 1766, and married Jonathan Holmes, son of Samuel Holmes, and Mary Stout, his wife. Samuel Holmes (b. Oct. 4, 1726; d. Aug. 26, 1769) was a son of Jonathan Holmes, Sr., by Rebecca Throckmorton, his second wife. They are both buried in old Topanemus grave yard. This Jonathan Holmes, son of Samuel Holmes and Mary Stout, his wife, married Ann Schenck, as above stated, and died without children, Nov. 16, 1814. His will is dated January 6, 1810, proved Nov. 22, 1814, and recorded at Freehold in Book A of Wills, p. 685, etc. He first orders that one-quarter of an acre of land on the farm where his brother, John S. Holmes, then lived, and "where the burying ground now is" shall be a burying- place for the Holmes family. He then gives to his brother, John S. Holmes, the use of all his real estate, and at his death to go to his two sons, Daniel and John, or the survivors of them in fee simple. This is the same farm in Pleasant Valley where ex-Sheriff Daniel Holmes lived, and where his son, the late Joseph H. Holmes, lived and died. The Holmes family still own it. Jonathan Holmes then made the fol- lowing bequests: To his sister Lydia, wife of Garret Stillwell, $250; to the children of his sister Parmelia, wife of John Stillwell, $250: to his brother, Stout Holmes, $375. This brother mar- ried first Elizabeth Pintard, second Mary Ogbourns, widow of Samuel Bray. One of his daughters, Alice, married ex- Judge Joseph Murphy, and was the mother of Holmes W. Murphy, who served two terms as clerk of Monmouth county and represented this county in General Assembly during the years 1880-81. He was associated with the writer as partner in law business for several years. Jonathan Holmes also gives by this will $375 to his sister Catharine, wife of Nathan Stout. To his brother, Samuel Holmes, he gives the interest yearly on $3,750 for life, and at his death to his son, Jonathan, if living. If dead, then $750 of principal to Samuel's two daughters, Mary and Catharine, and the remaining $3,000 to Daniel and John, sons of his brother, John S. Holmes. To Jonathan, son of his brother, Joseph Holmes, $500, and to Nelly, daughter of his brother Joseph, $125. To Joseph, son of David Crawford, $62.50, and to Joseph Covert, son of Daniel Covert, $62.50. To Jonathan Holmes, son of his brother Samuel, his clock, sideboard, silver tankard, best horse he has, his fusee and implements belonging to it. Orders all legacies paid in gold or silver. Directs Daniel and John, the two nephews to whom he gives all his real estate, not to sell it, but keep same in Holmes family forever. John S. Holmes named in this will married Sarah, daughter of Col. Daniel Hendrickson who commanded the Third Regiment of Monmouth militia during the Revolution, and was speaker of General Assembly of New Jersey in 1784. John S. Holmes also represented Monmouth county in General Assembly during years 1810-11 and 1813-14. His son Daniel married Rhoda VanMater, as has been mentioned in VanMater records. This Daniel Holmes was a mem- ber of the constitutional convention of 1844. The following paper has the genuine signatures of John S. Holmes, Col. Asher Holmes, and others who have been mentioned in these articles. It also shows that they appreciated education and good schools and made an effort to have an academy or high school established in Holmdel: "On condition that the acre of ground, this day sold by Obadiah Holmes unto us the undersubscribers, for erecting an academy; that if it should fail of success, then if its ever convenient to any other use, we engage to pay said Obadiah Holmes or his lawful representatives, the further sum of fifty pounds for said lot. This we engage in case that either us or our heirs shall convert it to any other purpose. Witness our hands this twenty-fourth day of December, seventeen hundred and ninety- three. ASHER HOLMES, BARNES SMOCK, THOMAS LLOYD, DANIEL KETCHAM. JOHN I. HOLMES. JOHN S. HOLMES. BARNES H. SMOCK, CHRINETONCB VanMATER. GARRET HENDRICKSON Witness present: HEN. HENDRICKSON, JARRET STILLWELL, WILLIAM BRITTON." Garret Hendrickson, who has signed above, was Lieut. Garret Hendrickson in Capt. Wm. Schenck's company, and Barnes Smock commanded an artillery company during the revolution. Hendrick Hendrickson, who signs as witness, was one of the county judges and part of time presiding judge, as out- court minutes from 1790 to 1800 show." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, The Hendricks or Hendrickson Family, p. 127, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Teuntje (I6119)
 
42 "Tobias, fourth son, married according to license dated March 21, 1762, Rebecca Coward, and died May 23, 1811, aged 70 years, 10 months, and 2 days, according to his headstone in Old Yellow Meeting House Cemetery. His will is recorded at Freehold as heretofore mentioned with some of his descendants in Barkalow Genealogy." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, Tobias Gysbertse (I6498)
 
43 "William the third son of Daniel Hen drickson and Catharine VanDyke, was baptized, November 6, 1709, married about 1731, Mary or Maria (bapt. May 6, 1702) daughter of Stoffie Langstraat and Maicken or Moyka Laen his wife. His wife's name appears as a communicant on records of Dutch church in 1741 as "Maria Langstraet, wife of Wilm Hindriekson." They had the following children: Catharine, baptized August 8, 1732, maried Jacob, son of Rem Remsen of Brooklyn, N. Y. He was born in 1719, died 1784. Their marriage license in Secretary of State office at Trenton was granted, August 11, 1747, "Catharine Hendrickson of Monmouth County to Jacob Remsen, Sr., of New York." They have one child baptized in our church May 6, 1750, and named William. His maternal grandparents were put down as sponsors. Daniel, baptized December 25, 1736, married in 1756, Catharine (b. Jan'y 29, 1738,) daughter of Rutgers VanBrunt and Elizabeth Voorhes, his wife, of New Utrecht, L. I. This Daniel Hendrickson was a land surveyor and was very prominent during the war for independence as Colonel of the 3rd Regiment of the Monmouth militia. These two children are the only ones William Hendrickson and Maria Longstreet, his wife had. William Hendrickson died intestate in 1783, and the records in the Secretary of State's office show that letters of administration were granted to their son Daniel, October 27, 1783. I do not know where he or his wife are buried but would not be surprised if it was somewhere in the vicinity of Tinton Falls, as his son Daniel, then resided there. Colonel Daniel Hendrickson by Catharine VanBrunt, his wife, had the following children: William, baptized July 31, 1757, died young. Elizabeth, baptized July 16, 1758, married Richard McKnight, Captain of Monmouth militia during Revolution. William, baptized January 11, 1761, died young. Daniel, born 1763, married Elizabeth, daughter of Barzillai Grover and Theodosia, his wife, of Upper Freehold. Mary, baptized March 17, 1765. Sarah, born March 9y 1767y married John S. Holmes, (b. Nov. 29, 1762y d. Aug. 15y 1821) son of Samuel Holmes and Mary Stout, his wife. Daniel Hendrickson and Nicholas VanBrunt represented Shrewsbury township in the Provincial Congress of New Jersey, in 1775. In minutes of Provincial Congress and of the Com- mittee of Safety of New Jersey, for vears 1775-6, his name is frequently mentioned. After the Revolution he represented Monmouth county four years in the General Assembly and in 1784 was Speaker of the House. I cannot find out where he is buried or date of his death. Like Captain Joshua Huddy, Captain Chadwick, and some others that served the people faithfully, the Republic has forgotten their graves. In Book M of Deeds, pages 161-165 in Monmouth County Clerk's office is rec- ord of two deeds from Daniel Hendrickson of Shrewsbury township. Both deeds are dated April 30, 1791. One conveys to Cornelius Luyster of Middletown, ten acres of land, being part of the lands which William Hendrickson, late of the township of Middletown, died seized of and which said Daniel Hendrickson claims title in part as an heir-at-law of his father, William Hen- drickson, aforesaid, and in part by a quit claim deed from Catharine Hendrickson, (Remsen) daughter of said William Hendrickson deceased, as one of his heirs at law. The ten acre tract is described as beginning at a maple tree on the west side of Mahoras brook, adjoining Luyster's land and the north- east corner of Daniel Hendrickson's cleared land. The second deed conveys to Peter Luyster a tract of woodland containing 20 acres, which William Hendrickson died seized of, and goes on to set out Daniel's title as in first deed. This land is described as beginning at the corner of the ten acre tract conveyed to Cornelius Luyster, and runs along line of this lot to Mahoras brook, and along said brook, etc. In Book L of Deeds, p. 97, etc., Monmouth county clerk's office, is record of a deed dated April 4, 1797, from Colonel Daniel Hendrickson of Shrewsbury township to Daniel Hendrickson, Jr.,* of Upper Freehold, and John S. Holmes of Middletown. in which it is set out that said Daniel Hendrickson, Sr., be- ing justly indebted to several persons in the sum of £1,720 ($8,600), and the said Daniel Hendrickson. Jr., (his son) and John S. Holmes, (his son-in-law) being engaged jointly with him, said __________ * In Book M of Deeds, page 473, etc., Mon- mouth county clerk's office is record of a deed from Jacob Hendrickson and John Polhemus, executors of John Polhemus, deceased, to Gar- ret Wyckoff of Upper Freehold, dated March 18, 1794, which sets out that John Polhemus, late of Upper Freehold, deceased, was seized of 213 68-100 acres in Upper Freehold, by deed from James Holmes dated May 1, 1762, and that said John Polhemus, by his will dated June 7, 1788, authorized and directed his ex- ecutors to sell the land generally described as bounded westward by Daniel Hendrickson's land in part and in part by Joel Clayton. Timothy Hankins, and Amos Miller; easterly by said Garret Wyckoff's land, and northerly by John Britton's mill pond and brook below said pond. This deed is witnessed by Daniel Hendrickson, Jr., and Samuel Imlay, and it shows where Daniel Hendrickson, Jr., lived in Upper Freehold. Daniel Hendrickson, Sr., for the payment of said sum, he thereby sells and conveys all his real estate to them to secure them for these liabilities, etc. In same Book L of Deeds, p. 100, etc., is record of another deed from Daniel Hendrickson, Sr., of Shrewsbury township, to Daniel Hendrickson, Jr., of Upper Freehold, John S. Holmes and John Holmes of Middletown township, Catharine Remsen, widow of Jacob Remsen of New York city, and Rutgers VanBrunt of Kings county, L. I. This deed dated April 5, 1797, sets out that Daniel Hendrickson, Sr., grantor, being justly indebted to Daniel Hendrickson, Jr., of Upper Freehold, *John S. Holmes and John Holmes of Middletown, Catharine Remsen and Rutgers VanBrunt of New York, does sell and convey them in settlement of said indebtedness all his real estate, consisting of several tracts of land at and near Tinton Falls in Shrewsbury township. Then follows description of these lands and state- ment: That the first two tracts at Tinton Falls, on which grist and saw mill stands, he claims title under a deed from Tunis Vanderveer dated May 10, 1773. The third tract by deed from John Morris dated May 25, 1783, and fourth tract by deed from Nicholas VanBrunt dated May 1, 1784. Like many other officers of the Revolution he served his country at a sacrifice. The seven years of war and confusion ruined his business. The raids of the refugees of which he was a victim two or three times, caused him great loss. The depreciation of the continental currency had also depreciated the value of his real estate, and there was no sale for real estate except __________ *John S. Holmes left a will, proved August 25, 1821, recorded at Freehold in Book B, p. 257, etc. Provides for his wife Sarah. Gives $7,500 to each of his four daughters, together with his grist mill and carding machines, viz: Mary, who married Albert VanBrunt; Catharine, who married Daniel H. Ellis of Freehold ; Emma, who married George Taylor of Freehold, and Eleanor, who married Charles Hasbrouck. All residue of his property, both real and personal, he gives to his two sons, Daniel and John H. in fee. ____________ at a ruinous sacrifice. He was thus compelled to make this transfer of all his lands to these near relatives in order to prevent an entire loss under a forced or sheriff's sale. Colonel Daniel Hendrickson died soon after this assignment, probably discouraged and broken hearted over his troubles and sorrows. When and where he died is unknown. Neither is his place of burial known. He lies in an unknown and unmarked grave. Such is the gratitude of a republic. We find Daniel Hendrickson and Elizabeth, his wife, of Upper Freehold, and John S. Holmes and Sarah, his wife of Middletown, by deed dated August 9, 1799, recorded in Book M of Deeds, p. 98, etc., Monmouth clerk's office, conveying part of the real estate to Colonel Barnes Smock, viz: that tract at Tinton Falls on which grist and saw mill and other buildings stand with benefit of millpond and stream as far as Colonel Daniel Hendrickson's dec'd, right extended. Also a tract of 12 50-100 acres near Tinton Falls which tracts with other lands wen sold by Lewis Morris Ashfield, Esq., to Jacob VanDerveer by deed dated May 5, 1762, and then sold at sheriff's sale January 28, 1772, to Tunis Vanderveer and by him sold to Col. Daniel Hen- drickson by deed dated May 10, 1773, and by him to above grantors by deed dated April 5, 1797; also 96 65-100 acres on west side of the road from Tinton Falls to Middletown. In Book N of Deeds, p. 184, etc, is record of a deed from Daniel Hendrickson and Elizabeth, his wife, of Upper hold, to John S. Holmes of Middleton, a merchant, conveying to him two tracts of land at Tinton Falls, which his father, Colonel Daniel Hen- rickson, deceased, owned in his lifetime. In Book O of Deeds, p. 109, etc. is record of a deed from Daniel Hendrickson and Elizabeth, his wife, of Upper Freehold, and John S. Holmes and Sarah, his wife, of Middletown, to Jacob Hubbard, dated April 25, 1800, conveying 19-1/2 acres of land which Col. Daniel Hendrickson owned in his lifetime
ACCOUNT OF A RAID OF TORY REFUGEES IN THE YEAR 1779. The following account of a raid on Col. Daniel Hendrickson at Tinton Falls by a party of refugees is taken from files of the New Jersey Gazette now in our state library in Trenton: "On June 9, 1779, a party of about 50 refugees landed in Monmouth and marched to Tinton Falls undiscovered, where they surprised and carried off Col. Daniel Hendrickson, Col. Wyckoff, Capt. Chadwick, Capt. McKnight with several privates of the militia, and drove off sheep and horned cattle. About thirty of our militia hastily collected and made some resistance, but were repulsed with loss of two men killed and ten wounded. Loss of enemy unknown." Thomas Chadwick and Richard McKnight were both captains of the Monmouth militia and the latter was a son- in-law of Col. Daniel Hendrickson. Auke Hendrickson was a miller by occupation and a lieutenant in Captain Peter Wyckoff's company from Upper Freehold. At this time he was employed in Col. Hendrickson's grist mill at Tinton Falls. Col. Hendrickson had collected quite a magazine of powder, arms and other military stores at Tinton Falls for the use of our county troops. Besides he had ground a large quantity of flour and meal for use of the American army. It is said that he had borrowed from his relatives, Mrs. Catharine Remsen and his father-in-law, Van- Brunt, in New York, £1,000 ($5,000). which he had used in the purchase of these stores. The spies of the enemy had carried information to the refugees on Sandy Hook and hence this raid, which entailed great pecuniary loss to Col. Hendrickson. The notorious James Moody in an account of his career, dictated by him and published in London, England, after the close of our Revolutionary War, gives his version of this raid. He says that on June 10, 1779, he was at Sandy Hook and in command of sixteen men. There he asked a friend named Hutchinson, who had six men and some guides, to assist him on an expedition against the rebels in Monmouth county. They started from Sandy Hook for Shrewsbury village and eluding the rebel guards reached a place called the Falls undiscovered, and surprised and made prisoners, one colonel, one lieutenant colonel, one major, two captains and other persons of lesser note. They destroyed a considerable magazine of powder and arms. With their prisoners and such stores as they could carry or bring off, Hutchinson took charge of, while Moody and his men remained in the rear. They were pursued by double their numbers. Moody with his sixteen men made a stand and kept up such a sharp fire on the rebels as to hold them back, while Hutchinson moved on with the prisoners and plunder. After Hutchinson had got a considerable distance ahead. Moody and his men would fall back. When they reached another good place they would make another stand, until in this way they reached Black Point (now Sea bright). Here they transported their prisoners and plunder over the inlet. The rebels were reinforced by ten men and made a determined attack, in which Captain Chadwick and Lieutenant Auke Hendrickson were shot dead. Moody says there was something peculiarly shocking in the death of the rebel captain. He was shot through by Moody while with most bitter oaths and threats of vengeance, after having once missed fire he was again leveling his gun at him. That after three men were killed and a number of others lay wounded, the rebels raised a flag of truce and asked for cessation of hostilities to remove their dead and wounded. This was agreed to on condition that they were allowed to remove and take away all their plunder. Moody says their goods and stores taken were sold for £500 ($2,500) and the money all divided among the men who were with him in this raid. Moody may have had only 16 men of his own and six of Hutchinson's when he started but he had at least fifty when he reached Tinton Falls before daylight. They found our men in bed and wholly unprepared. They threw a large quantity of powder in the mill pond and broke the guns. They seized all the horses and wagons they could find at Tinton Falls and vicinity and loaded them with a large quantity of stores, meal and flour from the mill, together with all the provisions and goods of value they could find. They drove off all the sheep and cattle on the farms around there, besides slaughtering several hogs, whose carcasses they took off in one of the wagons. They collected all this plunder and moved off down the road towards Shrewsbury village before our militia could gather. Then not over thirty men were in our force when they began their pursuit. They overtook the rear guards commanded by Moody in person somewhere in the vicinity of what is now Fair Haven. He, however, had all his prisoners stationed close by his men, so that our people could not fire, without endangering their lives as much as those of the refugees. Thus holding back our force he allowed Hutchinson with his train of wagons, cattle and sheep to get well in advance. Then falling back, still with the prisoners as shields to his men, he slowly followed. In this way they reached Black Point. There our people had ten more men to join them, and made a sharp attack on their flank while they were getting their plunder over the inlet. In the confusion Captain Chadwick and Lieutenant Auke Hendrickson broke loose from the enemy and ran over to our men. Lieutenant Hendrickson was a man of fiery temper and Captain Chadwick also was very excitable and passionate under provocation. The tantalizing and unfair way in which they had been used and treated while prisoners, by Moody had exasperated both to the verge of insanity. As soon as Lieutenant Hendrickson reached our line he grabbed a musket which had been discharged, and at once turned and ran towards Moody with loud threats and imprecations for his cowardly usage. His gun, of course, missed fire and he was shot down by Moody. Captain Chadwick, who had also turned on them, was killed at the same time by some of the other refugees. Some ten of our men were also wounded which made any further effort useless. A flag of truce was raised and Moody agreed to allow the removal of our dead and wounded provided they were permitted to carry off all their plunder. Like Captain Joshua Huddy, Captain Dennis, Lieutenant Whitlock, and many other patriots of our Revolution, who gave up their lives for American independence. Captain Chadwick and Lieutenant Auke Hendrickson lie in unknown and unmarked graves. Surely this is a reproach and a shame to the people of Monmouth county. Daniel Hendrickson, son of Col. Daniel Hendrickson and Catharine Van Brunt, his wife, married Elizabeth, daughter of Barzillai Grover. He resided in Upper Freehold township and carried on a grist mill located on Doctor's Creek in that township. I think this mill was at Red Valley, although I may be mistaken as to that. They had the following children: William, born June 2, 1782, married and removed to one of the western states. Barzillai, born February 19, 1784, married Elizabeth Horsefull. He owned and conducted the Union hotel at Freehold during the thirties of last century. Daniel, born May 19, 1786, died unmarried. His will was proved September 18, 1862, and recorded in Book G of Wills, page 470 at Freehold. Makes a bequest to his sister Theodosia, wife of Forman Hendrickson, and if dead, to her daughter Eliza, wife of Jacob Ellis. He gives to George Imlay $100, and residue of his property to his nep- hews, Enoch Hendrickson and Richard M. Hendrickson. Joseph, born March 14, 1788. James G., born February 19, 1791, married March 3, 1813, Hannah Morris. Samuel, born July 26, 1793, married Phoebe Mount. Theodosia, born November 2, 1795, married Forman, son of Jacob Hendrickson and Elizabeth Mount, his wife. Richard Howell, born November 2, 1795, married Lyde Perrine. Katharine, born June 29, 1797, mar- ried Peter Imlay. John B., born January 26, 1799, married Parmilla Grover. Enoch, born April 7, 1802, married Achsah Parker. Pierson, born July 31, 1803, married August 7, 1823, Sarah VanDorn. This last son resided many years at Tinton Falls, where he carried on a country store. Elizabeth Hendrickson, the mother of these ten boys and two girls, made her will January 27, 1843, proved December 6, 1851, recorded at Freehold in Book F of Wills, page 107, etc." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, pp. 134-137 Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. 
HENDRICKSON, Willem (I4553)
 
44 "William, eldest son of Guisbert, married according to license granted February 22, 1768, Rachel Longstreet. In Book I of deeds, page 496, Monmouth Clerk's office, is record of a deed dated February 2, 1778, from William Hendrickson and Rachel, his wife, of Upper Freehold, to Gilbert Longstreet of the same township. The grantors convey for £4,000 a tract of land in that township which Stoffel Longstreet had deeded to William Hendrickson, and "Peter Wecoff's" land, Albert Couwenhoven's lands, and Doctor's Creek are called for as monuments." Beeckman, George C., Early Dutch Settlers of Monmouth Co., New Jersey, Morrau Bros. Publishers Freehold NJ 1901, p.133, US/CAN 974.946 D2b. HENDRICKSON, William Gysbertse (I5336)
 
45 #:1-Life Sketch of Joseph Smith Hendricks p. 51, "Henry Hendricks Genealogy" by Marguerite H. Allen & the Hendricks Family Orgnization. # 2-Richmond Ward 1907 Mem. Rec. #353, FHL Film #025,601. # 3-Marysville Ward Mem. Rec., 1899-1919 #18, FHL Film #007,512. # 4-Endowment House End., Bk. B 1855-57, p. 19, FHL Film #183404. # 5-FGR compiled by Mabel F. H. Knapp, 1965 FGRC. # 6-Sariah was a TIPPETS by Adoption.

#:1-Life Sketch of Joseph Smith Hendricks p. 51, "Henry Hendricks Genealogy" by Marguerite H. Allen & the Hendricks Family Orgnization. # 2-Richmond Ward 1907 Mem. Rec. #353, FHL Film #025,601. # 3-Marysville Ward Mem. Rec., 1899-1919 #18, FHL Film #007,512. # 4-Endowment House End., Bk. B 1855-57, p. 19, FHL Film #183404. # 5-FGR compiled by Mabel F. H. Knapp, 1965 FGRC. # 6-Sariah was a TIPPETS by Adoption.

DW record number: 21406

TIPPETS by adoption 
PEW (TIPPETS), Sariah Fidelia (I4096)
 
46 1743-1811 Source (S98)
 
47 1963: 147 DW record number: 18452
See separate PAF data files for descendant information.

DW record number: 18452 
HENDRICKS, Rebecca Eliza (I584)
 
48 1963: 148 DW record number: 21463
Unmarried. No further information.

HHFO: D0111030305

1963: 148 DW record number: 21463
Unmarried. No further information.

DW record number: 21463 
HENDRICKS, William Melton (I597)
 
49 1963: 149 DW record number: 21475
See separate PAF data files for descendant information.

DW record number: 21475 
HENDRICKS, John Nelson (I598)
 
50 1963: 150 DW record number: 14561
See separate PAF data files for descendant information.

DESCENDANTS OF SAMUEL ALLEN HENDRICKS
Pre-release 0.1 JUNE, 1994. Created with PAF 2.2; 7 FEB 1991 update.

Distributed by the Henry Hendricks Family Organization:
Larry Hendricks
2372 S. Bountiful Blvd.
Bountiful, UT 84010 $10.00 donation suggested

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

The information contained in these files is as accurate as we can possibly make it; however, there still may be errors. Any corrections or new information will be gratefully accepted. Updates to these files may be made at various times. Notification of updates will be made through "The Hendricks Herald" newsletter available from the Henry Hendricks Family Organization and through the Samuel Allen Hendricks family organizations.

The Henry Hendricks Family Organization assumes that the users of these data files are familiar with the PAF programs and have obtained legal copies of the program and the accompanying instructions. Please refer any questions about PAF and how to use the various programs to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family History Department or to your local PAF specialists.

AN EXPLANATION OF THE IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS

The identification numbers used in this file are birth order codes indicating the relationship each individual has to Samuel Allen HENDRICKS. Within the note file for each individual will also be found the Henry Hendricks Family code showing the relationship to Henry HENDRICKS, the HENRY HENDRICKS GENEALOGY (1963) index number and Dale Walker's data index number when available. ID letter codes have the following meaning:

D Descendant
S1 Spouse 1
SF Spouse's Father
SM Spouse's Mother
X Extended ID for those beyond the fifth generation

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Samuel Allen HENDRICKS
HHFO: D11030404 1963: 150 DW record no: 14561

In the spring of 1850 Samuel's parents, together with an uncle, Josiah Hendricks (D110307) who was then a bachelor, fitted up a wagon and started for the gold fields of California. The family at that time consisted of Allen, his wife Elizabeth, and the four children: Eliza Rebecca, age 8; William, age 6; John Nelson, age 4; and Samuel Allen, age 1 1/2 years.

As they journeyed on across the plains many obstacles were encountered and some of the people became sick and died. As they came to North Platte, Nebraska, the mother, Elizabeth, died with cholera 12 June 1850 and when they arrived at Sweet Water, Wyoming, the father, Allen, died 12 July 1850. This left the four small children with Josiah Hendricks who brought them to Utah and placed them with relatives. Samuel Allen lived with Neriah and Rebecca (Hendricks, D110303) LEWIS and when he was eight years old Rebecca died. He still lived with Neriah Lewis after her death. When his cousin William H. LEWIS (D11030301) married he lived with them. During this period the Utah Pioneers went through very perilous times and most of the people were poor, having very little of this world's goods, and the Lewis' were no exception. Samuel Allen was assigned the task of herding sheep from early spring until late fall. His sister told the story of him during this period. She said that for some time they hadn't seen each other. She saw a bare-footed, scantily clad, dirty little boy herding sheep and when she got closer to him found it was her brother.

He never had a suit of clothes in his youth and received very little schooling, but took advantage of every opportunity to learn. He stayed with the Lewis family until he was sixteen and then went out for himself. He received employment from a company that was hauling freight into Butte, Montana. He worked during the summer and stayed with the William Dorris Hendricks (D111002) family and others in the winter and as soon as he could, purchased an outfit of his own and freighted from Corinne, Utah to Butte, Montana. Samuel Allen changed from freighting to railroading and shortly formed partnership with Herschel BULLEN (D11100221-S1) to do railroad building. This was some time near 1875-1880. They were successful in this venture and were soon able to build homes and purchase farms in Lewiston and Richmond, Utah. His home in Richmond was completed in 1883. He continued in the contracting business until his death which occurred on 26 June 1900 at Santiago, Durango, Mexico of heart trouble, and like his brother John, had to be buried immediately in Mexico according to the Mexican law. --HENRY HENDRICKS GENEALOGY, pp. 65-66.

HHFO: D0111100203-S1
DW record number: 14561

HHFO: D0111030307

1963: 150 DW record number: 14561
See separate PAF data files for descendant information.

HHFO: D0111100203-S1
DW record number: 14561

HHFO: D0111030307

1963: 150 DW record number: 14561
See separate PAF data files for descendant information. 
HENDRICKS, Samuel Allen (I571)
 

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